LCFF Budget Overview for Parents

School districts receive funding from different sources: state funds under the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF), other state funds, local funds, and federal funds. LCFF funds include a base level of funding for all LEAs and extra funding—called "supplemental and concentration" grants—to LEAs based on the enrollment of high needs students (foster youth, English learners, and low-income students).

Budget Overview for the 2019–20 LCAP Year

A pie chart breaking down Sherman Thomas STEM Academy's revenue by fund source. 73.2 percent of the revenue comes from Other LCFF funds, 14.5 percent from local funds, 9 percent from LCFF supplemental and concentration grants, 3.4 percent from federal funds, and 0.3 percent from other state funds.
This chart shows the total general purpose revenue Sherman Thomas STEM Academy expects to receive in the coming year from all sources.

The total revenue projected for Sherman Thomas STEM Academy is $637,297.00, of which $520,717.00 is Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF), $2,000.00 is other state funds, $92,631.00 is local funds, and $21,949.00 is federal funds. Of the $520,717.00 in LCFF Funds, $54,102.00 is generated based on the enrollment of high needs students (foster youth, English learner, and low-income students).

The LCFF gives school districts more flexibility in deciding how to use state funds. In exchange, school districts must work with parents, educators, students, and the community to develop a Local Control and Accountability Plan (LCAP) that shows how they will use these funds to serve students.

A bar graph illustrating Sherman Thomas STEM Academy's planned expenditures for 2019–20. The total planned expenditures are $637,297, and the planned expenditures tied to actions/services in the LCAP are $411,900.
This chart provides a quick summary of how much Sherman Thomas STEM Academy plans to spend for 2019–20. It shows how much of the total is tied to planned actions and services in the LCAP.

Sherman Thomas STEM Academy plans to spend $637,297.00 for the 2019–20 school year. Of that amount, $411,900.00 is tied to actions/services in the LCAP and $225,397.00 is not included in the LCAP. The budgeted expenditures that are not included in the LCAP will be used for the following:

Increased or Improved Services for High Needs Students in 2019–20

In 2019–20, Sherman Thomas STEM Academy is projecting it will receive $54,102.00 based on the enrollment of foster youth, English learner, and low-income students. Sherman Thomas STEM Academy must demonstrate the planned actions and services will increase or improve services for high needs students compared to the services all students receive in proportion to the increased funding it receives for high needs students. In the LCAP, Sherman Thomas STEM Academy plans to spend $59,918.00 on actions to meet this requirement.

A bar graph comparing the budgeted versus the estimated actual expenditures for actions to increase or improve services for high needs students in 2018–19. The budgeted expenditures are $53,579; the estimated actual expenditures are $45,495.
This chart compares what Sherman Thomas STEM Academy budgeted last year in the LCAP for actions and services that contribute to increasing or improving services for high needs students with what Sherman Thomas STEM Academy estimates it has spent on actions and services that contribute to increasing or improving services for high needs students in the current year.

In 2018–19, Sherman Thomas STEM Academy's LCAP budgeted $53,579.00 for planned actions to increase or improve services for high needs students. Sherman Thomas STEM Academy estimates that it will actually spend $45,495.00 for actions to increase or improve services for high needs students in 2018–19. The difference between the budgeted and actual expenditures of $8,084.00 had the following impact on Sherman Thomas STEM Academy's ability to increase or improve services for high needs students:

The difference in spending did not impact the actions and services for high needs students. Our field trip costs ended up being much lower than originally anticipated (we budgeted on group discount numbers—not school group), even with us attending three more field trips than originally planned. Also, we no longer pay an EL Coordinator stipend, but rather it is an additional listed job duty on the teacher's contract. Our contract for our reading and math program was also cheaper than originally anticipated. We completed all actions listed in our LCAP and exceeded all goals, with less money being expended.

Local Control Accountability Plan and Annual Update (LCAP) Template

2017–20 Plan Summary

The Story

Describe the students and community and how the LEA serves them.

We are a new small STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) middle school, serving 75 students in grades six, seven, and eight with a college and career emphasis. Our grand opening was August 21, 2017. Our student demographic information is 64% Hispanic, 30% Caucasian, 3% African American, 3% Asian, and 50% of our students are unduplicated (English Learners, free/reduced lunch, foster/homeless youth).

One of the things that is exciting about our demographic is that it truly is a cross-section of Madera. Our students do not all live in the same area because attending our schools is not based on a child's address (although preference is given to all students living within Madera Unified School District). Of our current 75 students, we have students who have come from 17 different schools (public, public charter, and private) within Madera. This provides a great opportunity for creating a community celebrating differences.

Something that makes us unique is that we are the first STEM school in our county. We believe in an integrative instructional model where we apply the principles of the subjects of STEM, Science (hypothesizing and investigating), Technology (improvements that foster ease of a task), Engineering (design process), and Mathematics (identifying problems and persevering to solve them) in all subject areas. Our motto, Dream it, Think it, Do it, is a constant focal point. The lessons are designed to be engaging and interactive with our Fridays, which are specifically set aside for hands on projects, college and career emphasis, field trips, and guest speakers. We are excited to bring these opportunities to the children of our entire community.

LCAP Highlights

2017–2020 LCAP Goals:

  1. To prepare students through rigorous and relevant content, to be productive and successful citizens by developing a strong work ethic, and the higher level critical thinking skills needed to solve problems in the 21st century world.
  2. For all parents to embrace their VOICE (Volunteer, Outings, Inform, Challenge Days, Engage).
  3. To provide a safe, positive, organized setting with clearly defined behavior expectations where effective character education enhances the academic program, while developing habits of professionalism.

Being a small school, there is not a lot of revenue, but small class and school size is important to our parents and staff. A key element of our school, that with the exception of salaries and our facility lease, has the largest apportionment of our funds, is our field trip program. We believe it is vital to a child's education to foster higher-level critical thinking skills, and a well-rounded character education program that focuses on professionalism to get students "in the field." In year one (2017–18), all students got to go to 3 college campuses (Reedley College, Fresno State University, and California Polytechnic University San Luis Obispo), 4 community business trips, and 3 enrichment field trips, including Knott's Berry Farm for their Middle School Physics Day and Medieval Times. This current year (2019–19) students visited 4 college campuses (Fresno City, UC Merced, UC Davis, and the California Health Science University), 7 local businesses, and went on 2 enrichment trips. College, and careers to a different extent, seem far away and mysterious to students in this age group in our community. We want kids to see these possibilities as accessible and to understand there are steps they can take, even now, in middle school, to put them on a realistic pathway toward their dreams. We not only wish to open their minds to these possibilities but help build habits they can use on their way through high school and college or higher education training programs. This is a key to our program and is a continued goal for this year. We will be visiting 3 college campuses (Madera Community College Center, Fresno Pacific University, and Stanford University) at least 3 local businesses, and taking all students to a science camp.

Review of Performance

Greatest Progress

Based on a review of performance on the state indicators and local performance indicators included in the California School Dashboard, progress toward LCAP goals, local self-assessment tools, stakeholder input, or other information, what progress is the LEA most proud of and how does the LEA plan to maintain or build upon that success? This may include identifying any specific examples of how past increases or improvements in services for low-income students, English learners, and foster youth have led to improved performance for these students.

We have had a great second year at the Academy. Our year one test scores were the highest in our city, which we are using as a motivator for our 2018–19 testing (which has not yet begun, and therefore we do not have results). We encourage our students to work hard every day—that's what it means to be a Raven. We are proud to have reached all expected measurable outcomes set forth in the previous year's LCAP that we have data on at this point. On local assessments, 75% of our students have grown at least one year and/or are at grade level in reading and mathematics, school wide. Over 90% of our Stakeholders report being highly satisfied with our school.

Greatest Needs

Referring to the California School Dashboard, identify any state indicator or local performance indicator for which overall performance was in the "Red" or "Orange" category or where the LEA received a "Not Met" or "Not Met for Two or More Years" rating. Additionally, identify any areas that the LEA has determined need significant improvement based on review of local performance indicators or other local indicators. What steps is the LEA planning to take to address these areas with the greatest need for improvement?

Since 2017–18 was our school's first year of existence, we do not have any "red" or "orange" performance categories. Last year was our school's first time taking the CAASPP, so our scores are being used as baseline data. This year, 2018–19 will be our first chance to show increase or decline, and therefore will be our first time having "colors." That being said, we do have areas of concern that we as a staff are working to address. While we met our goal of 75% of students growing a minimum of one year and/or being at grade level in reading and math, we barely met it (74.8%). We see this as an area for us to work on and are looking for ways to improve. This was a 4.78% increase over last year, but we were hoping to see greater growth.

Performance Gaps

Referring to the California School Dashboard, identify any state indicator for which performance for any student group was two or more performance levels below the "all student" performance. What steps is the LEA planning to take to address these performance gaps?

Since 2017–18 was our first year testing and we do not have data for 2018–19 yet, we don't have any state indicators on the Dashboard. That being said, I do have data broken down by subgroup for the 2017–18 results (we have not yet done our 2018–19 testing). Overall, our school had 74% of our students meet/exceed standard in English and 55% met/exceeded standard in math. We had several subgroups that performed below this—which I would see as a gap to be addressed. Our Hispanic students were 5% below in English and 6% below in Math. Our socio-economically disadvantaged students were 7% below in English and 22% below in math (this is the biggest and most concerning gap). Our boys were also 4% below in English and 6% below in Math. Our highest performing subgroup in Math was our white students, with 68% meeting/exceeding standard and our girls, with 64%. Our highest performing sub-group in English were our RFEP students, with 91% meeting/exceeding standard. Most of our sub-groups were within 10% of our overall score, which I don't consider to be a significant performance gap.

Comprehensive Support and Improvement

An LEA with a school or schools identified for comprehensive support and improvement (CSI) under the Every Student Succeeds Act must respond to the following prompts.

Schools Identified

Identify the schools within the LEA that have been identified for CSI.

No schools within the LEA have been identified for CSI

Support for Identified Schools

Describe how the LEA supported the identified schools in developing CSI plans that included a school-level needs assessment, evidence-based interventions, and the identification of any resource inequities to be addressed through the implementation of the CSI plan.

NA

Support for Identified Schools

Describe how the LEA will monitor and evaluate the implementation and effectiveness of the CSI plan to support student and school improvement.

NA

Annual Update

LCAP Year Reviewed: 2018–19

Complete a copy of the following table for each of the LEA's goals from the prior year LCAP. Duplicate the table as needed.

Goal: 1

To prepare students, through rigorous and relevant content, to be productive and successful citizens by developing a strong work ethic and the higher-level critical thinking skills needed to solve problems in the 21st century world.

State and/or Local Priorities addressed by this goal:

Actions/Services

Duplicate the Actions/Services from the prior year LCAP and complete a copy of the following table for each. Duplicate the table as needed.

Action 1

Action 2

Action 3

Action 4

Action 5

Action 6

Action 7

Analysis

Complete a copy of the following table for each of the LEA's goals from the prior year LCAP. Duplicate the table as needed. Use actual annual measurable outcome data, including performance data from the LCFF Evaluation Rubrics, as applicable.

Describe the overall implementation of the actions/services to achieve the articulated goal.

All stated actions were implemented to achieve the articulated goal.

Describe the overall effectiveness of the actions/services to achieve the articulated goal as measured by the LEA.

Through the above mentioned actions we believe that we were able to achieve our expected annual measurable outcomes as we continue to strive to fully reach this goal. There is still room for growth, but we have met our year one and two outcomes. There are still some areas that we do not know the results of yet, but we have achieved all outcomes that we have information for at this time. We believe that by continuing to reach for and achieve these specific measurable outcomes, that we will reach our goal of preparing students for the 21st century world.

Explain material differences between Budgeted Expenditures and Estimated Actual Expenditures.

We are still calculating final expenditures, but at this time, there do not appear to be any material differences between Budget Expenditures and Estimated Actual Expenditures. One area that changed this year is the EL Stipend. In 2017–18, it was a stipend and that was the plan at the beginning of this year. Instead, the job duty was added to the teacher's contract and she was given a raise. Our estimated actuals, for this goal, are approximately $5,000 higher than budgeted, which is mainly due to a higher than anticipated cost in employee benefits. Projections were based off of approximately 30% of an employee's salary, when in reality it was closer to 37% due to rising costs.

Describe any changes made to this goal, expected outcomes, metrics, or actions and services to achieve this goal as a result of this analysis and analysis of the LCFF Evaluation Rubrics, as applicable. Identify where those changes can be found in the LCAP.

We have not made any changes to this goal and will continue to work hard to achieve it. The only change that has been made for 2019–20, is that the EL Coordinator has a $0 cost because it is embedded into the teacher's salary.

Goal: 2

For all parents to embrace their VOICE (Volunteer, Outings, Inform, Challenge Days, Engage) at STA

State and/or Local Priorities addressed by this goal:

Actions/Services

Duplicate the Actions/Services from the prior year LCAP and complete a copy of the following table for each. Duplicate the table as needed.

Action 1

Action 2

Analysis

Complete a copy of the following table for each of the LEA's goals from the prior year LCAP. Duplicate the table as needed. Use actual annual measurable outcome data, including performance data from the LCFF Evaluation Rubrics, as applicable.

Describe the overall implementation of the actions/services to achieve the articulated goal.

All actions were implemented to achieve this articulated goal.

Describe the overall effectiveness of the actions/services to achieve the articulated goal as measured by the LEA.

Our goal was for all parents to embrace their VOICE at STA and I believe we have achieved this goal. For the second year in a row, we exceeded our expected measurable outcomes, in each area. Our parents have repeatedly voiced how much they love our school and their sadness that it is only a 3 year program. I feel confident they have embraced their VOICE at STA through the culture we have created from frequent communication.

Explain material differences between Budgeted Expenditures and Estimated Actual Expenditures.

There are no material differences between Budgeted Expenditures and Estimated Actual Expenditures because there are no expenditures. The amount budgeted is $0—it is embedded within the teacher salaries.

Describe any changes made to this goal, expected outcomes, metrics, or actions and services to achieve this goal as a result of this analysis and analysis of the LCFF Evaluation Rubrics, as applicable. Identify where those changes can be found in the LCAP.

The only change we are making is the addition of usage of the app "Remind." Some parents have voiced an interest in using a communication app, as a way of sending text alerts. We decided on Remind because most of our graduating 8th graders will be going to schools within our authorizer's district and the high schools there use Remind. Other than that, we are making no changes. It is our goal to continue to foster an environment where parents feel that they are an integral part of our program and that they have a VOICE at STA.

Goal: 3

To provide a safe, positive, organized setting with clearly defined behavior expectations where effective character education enhances the academic program, while developing habits of professionalism.

State and/or Local Priorities addressed by this goal:

Actions/Services

Duplicate the Actions/Services from the prior year LCAP and complete a copy of the following table for each. Duplicate the table as needed.

Action 1

Action 2

Action 3

Action 4

Analysis

Complete a copy of the following table for each of the LEA's goals from the prior year LCAP. Duplicate the table as needed. Use actual annual measurable outcome data, including performance data from the LCFF Evaluation Rubrics, as applicable.

Describe the overall implementation of the actions/services to achieve the articulated goal.

All actions were implemented to achieve the articulated goal.

Describe the overall effectiveness of the actions/services to achieve the articulated goal as measured by the LEA.

We exceeded every expected annual measurable outcome set for the 2018–19 school year. All field trips were designed to enhance character education and/or develop habits of professionalism. We believe providing these opportunities brings meaning to the classroom and context. Having adults share the importance of education and constantly showing students the "end game" helps with motivation. We have an excellent attendance rate, minimal suspension, and very few behavior issues. We have worked hard to create a culture of excellence where students feel safe and strive to do their best.

Explain material differences between Budgeted Expenditures and Estimated Actual Expenditures.

We are still calculating final expenditures, but at this time, there do not appear to be any material differences between Budget Expenditures and Estimated Actual Expenditures.

Describe any changes made to this goal, expected outcomes, metrics, or actions and services to achieve this goal as a result of this analysis and analysis of the LCFF Evaluation Rubrics, as applicable. Identify where those changes can be found in the LCAP.

No changes were made to this goal, expected outcomes, metrics, or actions and services.

Stakeholder Engagement

LCAP Year: 2019–20

Involvement Process for LCAP and Annual Update

How, when, and with whom did the LEA consult as part of the planning process for this LCAP/Annual Review and Analysis?

Every month, our school has something that we call STAff chat (STA is our school abbreviation—so it is a play on our initials and the word staff).  The entire staff has attended at least one of these chats as well as almost half of our parents. The principal/8th grade teacher and 6th grade teacher have been at all and ran them. At these monthly meetings, we always go over things that we have done as well as any upcoming events. We end each one with a time of discussion—asking parents for input regarding things that we are doing well and areas for improvement. We also specifically address budgetary issues and discuss possible ideas regarding changes for the future. Our parents have been educated on the LCAP and its purpose and given opportunities to provide feedback.

Our teachers are not part of a bargaining unit, but all staff (classified and certified) were consulted regarding the LCAP, through STAff chats as well as staff meetings.

In addition to monthly STAff chats, we also have monthly board meetings, where community stakeholders were given time to provide input regarding STA. They were also given updates on items discussed in the 2018–19 LCAP budget and given opportunity for feedback regarding decisions being made.

We also have a student council who meets weekly with the principal. They plan upcoming events and also provide meaningful feedback, sharing what they like and possible areas for improvement.

The site principal also consulted, regularly, with the Sherman Thomas Charter Schools fiscal analyst to ensure that expenditures were within the budget and to confirm budgetary numbers for the 2019–20 school year.

Impact on LCAP and Annual Update

How did these consultations impact the LCAP for the upcoming year?

As we anticipated, we have learned, through monthly STAff chats as well as a parent and student surveys, that our field trip program is very important to our parents. They are extremely appreciative of the opportunities afforded to ALL students at the Academy and the fact that everyone gets to attend for free without any fundraising. This has proven to be very popular amongst parents and students. We all see the value that this hands on experience gives to students in their education and will continue to have our field trip budget be one of the largest areas of allotted funds.

Through these consultations, we found that there were very few areas that stakeholders wished to be changed. The one area that some parents and students did wish we had was sports. We do not run an athletic program. When we explained to parents why we do not participate in the MULES league, they understood. There is also a great opportunity for our 7th and 8th grade students to compete for the MUSD middle school whose boundary they reside in, which many of our students have taken advantage of. We have had students compete at Thomas Jefferson, Martin Luther King, and Desmond Middle School in football, volleyball, golf, cross country, wrestling, basketball, track and field, soccer, and swimming.

We are running a program that fosters collaboration and habits of professionalism. Our parents feel that they are integral in their child's education and have found their VOICE. Our students feel safe, accepted, and want to be at school. It appears that all three goals we set are areas that our stakeholders still value and we will continue to work towards making them become an even stronger reality.

Goals, Actions, & Services

Strategic Planning Details and Accountability

Complete a copy of the following table for each of the LEA's goals. Duplicate the table as needed.

Goal 1 (Unchanged)

To prepare students, through rigorous and relevant content, to be productive and successful citizens by developing a strong work ethic and the higher-level critical thinking skills needed to solve problems in the 21st century world.

State and/or Local Priorities addressed by this goal:

Identified Need:

Fully credentialed teachers with EL certification, 100% of students with access to state board adopted content and performance standards aligned lessons including EL students and individuals with exceptional needs, and growth of students in ELA and Mathematics.

Expected Annual Measurable Outcomes

Planned Actions/Services

Complete a copy of the following table for each of the LEA's Actions/Services. Duplicate the table, including Budgeted Expenditures, as needed.

Goal 2 (Unchanged)

For all parents to embrace their VOICE (Volunteer, Outings, Inform, Challenge Days, Engage) at STA.

State and/or Local Priorities addressed by this goal:

Identified Need:

Parent participation in our challenge days (hands on projects with the kids), field trips, monthly STAff chats, quarterly family nights, and parent-teacher conferences.

Expected Annual Measurable Outcomes

Planned Actions/Services

Complete a copy of the following table for each of the LEA's Actions/Services. Duplicate the table, including Budgeted Expenditures, as needed.

Goal 3 (Unchanged)

To provide a safe, positive, organized setting with clearly defined behavior expectations where effective character education enhances the academic program, while developing habits of professionalism.

State and/or Local Priorities addressed by this goal:

Identified Need:

Facility with a space that functions for learning objectives, clearly defined behavior expectations laid out in parent/student handbook and discussed with parents and students, student study team for academic, attendance, and behavior issues, and engaging class activities and field trips that promote attendance, behavior, and a more competent 21st century work force.

Expected Annual Measurable Outcomes

Planned Actions/Services

Complete a copy of the following table for each of the LEA's Actions/Services. Duplicate the table, including Budgeted Expenditures, as needed.

Demonstration of Increased or Improved Services for Unduplicated Pupils

LCAP Year: 2017–18

Describe how services provided for unduplicated pupils are increased or improved by at least the percentage identified above, either qualitatively or quantitatively, as compared to services provided for all students in the LCAP year.

Identify each action/service being funded and provided on a schoolwide or LEA-wide basis. Include the required descriptions supporting each schoolwide or LEA-wide use of funds (see instructions).

Intervention Teacher – $6,468
This person will be working with students on specifically targeted skills in two to three week rotations. Skills will primarily be based on foundational ELA and Mathematics standards to fill "holes" in a child's education, working towards closing the achievement gap.

EL Coordinator – $2,000
This person will ensure that we are compliant and that all teachers are properly implementing ELD standards and strategies as well as tracking and assessing our EL students.

Classroom Aid – $4,800
20% of this person's daily responsibilities will include working as an aid in the classroom in the morning, helping struggling students, with an emphasis on working with English Learners ($4,800 represents 20% of their annual salary).

LCAP Year: 2018–19

Describe how services provided for unduplicated pupils are increased or improved by at least the percentage identified above, either qualitatively or quantitatively, as compared to services provided for all students in the LCAP year.

Identify each action/service being funded and provided on a schoolwide or LEA-wide basis. Include the required descriptions supporting each schoolwide or LEA-wide use of funds (see instructions).

Intervention Teacher – $7,292
This person will be working with students on specifically targeted skills in two to three week rotations. Skills will primarily be based on foundational ELA and Mathematics standards to fill "holes" in a child's education, working towards closing the achievement gap.

EL Coordinator – $2,000
This person will ensure that we are compliant and that all teachers are properly implementing ELD standards and strategies as well as tracking and assessing our EL students.

Classroom Aid – $5,300
20% of this person's daily responsibilities will include working as an aid in the classroom in the morning, helping struggling students, with an emphasis on working with English Learners ($5,300 represents 20% of their annual salary).

Professional Development – $10,000
The focus of our staff development will be on English Language Arts, specifically addressing improving the reading level of English Learners and other effective strategies for reaching EL students.

Renaissance Reading and Math Program and Reward Trip – $8,000
The purpose of this is to monitor achievement and growth of all students, LEA-wide. While it is a tool for tracking all students, we will specifically focus on and target EL students with strategies based off of data. The goal of the end of year reward trip is to serve as an extrinsic motivation, in addition to the intrinsic we will be using all year.

Field Trip Program – $25,000
We believe that getting students in the field of actual businesses, on college campuses, and providing them with enrichment experiences help build character education, habits of professionalism, and more all-around students. We realize that many of these experiences often elude children in our community because of finances. All of these experiences are provided to our entire student body population at no cost to the families. This is an integral part of the educational program at the Academy.

LCAP Year: 2019–20

Describe how services provided for unduplicated pupils are increased or improved by at least the percentage identified above, either qualitatively or quantitatively, as compared to services provided for all students in the LCAP year.

Identify each action/service being funded and provided on a schoolwide or LEA-wide basis. Include the required descriptions supporting each schoolwide or LEA-wide use of funds (see instructions).

Intervention Teacher – $8,918
This person will be working with students on specifically targeted skills in two to three week rotations. Skills will primarily be based on foundational ELA and Mathematics standards to fill "holes" in a child's education, working towards closing the achievement gap ($8,198 represents approximately 9.2% of this teacher's overall salary and benefits as this is the portion of her daily duties dedicated solely to intervention).

Classroom Aid – $6,000
20% of this person's daily responsibilities will include working as an aid in the classroom in the morning, helping struggling students, with an emphasis on working with English Learners ($6,000 represents 20% of their annual salary).

Renaissance Reading and Math Program and Reward Trip – $8,000
The purpose of this is to monitor achievement and growth of all students, LEA-wide. While it is a tool for tracking all students, we will specifically focus on and target EL students with strategies based off of data. The goal of the end of year reward trip is to serve as an extrinsic motivation, in addition to the intrinsic we will be using all year.

Field Trip Program – $25,000
We believe that getting students in the field of actual businesses, on college campuses, and providing them with enrichment experiences help build character education, habits of professionalism, and more all-around students. We realize that many of these experiences often elude children in our community because of finances. The reason for the increase in funding this year, over the previous two years, is that we will taking all students to a 4-day 3-night Science Camp. All of these experiences are provided to our entire student body population at no cost to the families. This is an integral part of the educational program at the Academy.